fbpx

Booth UC Professor, and Senior Psychology Student, to Study Problem Gambling with the Help of New Research Fund

Booth UC Professor, and Senior Psychology Student, to Study Problem Gambling with the Help of New Research Fund

October 29, 2020

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

WINNIPEG, October 29, 2020 – Booth UC Professor, and Senior Psychology Student, to Study Problem Gambling with the Help of New Research Fund

Booth University College is honoured to announce that Dr. Evan Curtis, Assistant Professor of Psychology, has been awarded a prestigious research grant through the Dr. Edgar and Ynez Smutny Memorial Fund. Dr. Curtis, along with a senior psychology student, will be studying, Predicting Problem Gambling Using Cumulative Prospect Theory.

This year, Booth University College was able to establish a research grant to support a project led by a faculty member of Booth UC. Three significant grant proposals were submitted to a review committee. The committee recommended, and Booth UC Cabinet concurred, that this year’s funds should be used to support a project led by Dr. Evan Curtis.

The project, Predicting Problem Gambling Using Cumulative Prospect Theory, is part of a longer-term study of problem gambling. It is also an opportunity for Booth UC students to become involved in research.

Dr. Evan Curtis

“My hope for the research is to leverage theories of behavioural economics to inform effective methods of treatment and help the development of early screening tools that can be administered before problem gambling behaviours even begin to manifest,” explains Dr. Curtis. “One of our senior students in the Department of Psychology will be working on the project as part of her Honours Thesis.”

“I think behavioural economics theories are best suited for gambling specifically,” continues Dr. Curtis. “The theory we are using models people’s assessments of monetary value and probability, and the question is whether (in addition to all the social and biological factors) there is something about someone’s subjective evaluation of risky financial decisions that adds to the puzzle.”

Problem gambling is prevalent and has severe negative consequences. The proposed research will make unique contributions to the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of this life-shattering disorder. Bringing insights from cognitive psychology into these efforts is reflective of Booth University College’s mandate of Education for a Better World.

-30-

For more information please contact:
Kimberly Kakegamic, Communications Specialist
204-918-8530
kimberly.kakegamic@boothuc.ca